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About the East Riding coastline

Information about the East Riding's coastal features, including the Heritage Coasts of Flamborough Head and Spurn Point.

What is the East Riding coastline like?

The 85 kilometres (53 miles) of coastline in the East Riding of Yorkshire offer a wonderful variety of landscapes and points of interest.

The 120-metre high chalk cliffs, stacks, caves, and coves at Bempton and Flamborough Head support large numbers of breeding seabirds such as puffins, gannets and razorbills.  Flamborough has been recognised internationally as a Special Area of Conservation (SAC) and Special Protection Area (SPA).  These designations combine to create a European Marine Site (EMS) which protects the internationally important breeding seabird colony and habitats.

From north to south, the resort towns of Bridlington, Hornsea and Withernsea offer traditional seaside attractions and high quality beaches.

Home to a number of traditional villages and quiet rural beaches, the flat area known as Holderness is subject to one of North West Europe’s fastest average rates of coastal erosion (1.5-2.5 metres per year).

Famous for its isolation and serenity, the spit feature of Spurn Point extends into the mouth of the Humber Estuary and is owned and managed by Yorkshire Wildlife Trust.  It is home to a mosaic of beach, mudflat, saltmarsh, dune, grassland, open water, saline lagoon and native sea buckthorn scrub.  Spurn has been recognised nationally as an SPA, a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), and a National Nature Reserve (NNR).

Further information about coastal attractions is available.

What are Heritage Coasts?

Natural England applies the "Heritage Coast" definition to stretches of beautiful, undeveloped coastline which are managed to conserve their natural beauty and, where appropriate, to improve accessibility for visitors.  

The East Riding has two stretches of Heritage Coast, Flamborough Head and Spurn Point, as described in the question above.